FAQ

Q: What’s the relationship between most 1.x and @most/core?

A: @most/core is a new implementation of most’s architecture, based on lessons learned from building and maintaining most. It has a leaner API that is more tailored to a functional style of programming.

Most 2.0 will be implemented on top of @most/core.

If you’re starting a new project and @most/core’s leaner API and programming style fit your goals, we recommend starting with it rather than most.

Q: How do I upgrade from most 1.x to @most/core?

See the Upgrading to @most/core from most 1.x.

Q: I want to process Arrays / time series data. Should I use ``@most/core`` for that?

A: No. @most/core is focused on reactive event programming rather than Array or time series processing. Read more here.

Q: I want to stream chunked data with flow control (also known as “back pressure”). Should I use ``@most/core`` for that?

A: No. @most/core is focused on reactive event programming rather than chunked/block data streaming Read more here.

Q: Are ``@most/core`` event streams the same as Node streams?

A: No. @most/core and Node streams are both based on the general concept of [stream processing](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stream_processing). However, they differ in their specific goals, architectures, and APIs.

@most/core Event Streams

  • deal with discrete events as they happen, such as mouse clicks, where reactivity (timeliness) is a significant factor;
  • provide an API of functions for filtering, transforming, merging, etc. discrete event streams; and
  • add new functionality by writing new event sources and functions.

In contrast, Node streams